RECIPE OF THE WEEK: Black Rice Risotto with Salmon

black rice salmon rissotto

1 cup glutinous black rice, soaked overnight
3 tablespoons regular white rice, soaked for 1 hour
600 ml water
4 x 150 g Salmon fillets, skin on
Sea Salt
5 tablespoons butter
4 medium leeks, finely sliced
3 tablespoons seeded mustard
2 tablespoons lime juice
4 Kaffer lime leaves
500 ml chicken stock
Freshly ground black pepper
Vegetable oil
2 tablespoons cream
1 teaspoons greated palm sugar
2 tablespoons fried shallots
Chopped chives, to garnish

Strain the black rice and white rice and combine in a heavy-based saucepan. Add the water and bring the boil. Cook uncovered for 30 minutes, or until the black rice is a soft al dente and the water is absorbed or evaporated (you can add more water if the rice dries out before it is cooked)

Pat the salmon fillets dry. Pour a layer of salt onto a plate and press skin side of the filets onto it. Set aside for up to 1 hour. (the salt will dry the skin out a little and will be wiped off before cooking)

Heat a work or saucepan over low heat and add the butter. Once it has melted, throw in the leek and fry for 1 minutes, or until wilted. Add rice, mustard, lime juice, lime leaves and chicken stock. Simmer for 25 minutes or until the rice is soft and the stock is absorbed.

Towards the end of the cooking time, heat a frying pan over medium heat. Use the blande of a knife to wipe off the salt and any moisture from the skin of the salmon fillets. Seasons the skin with pepper and the flesh with salt and pepper. Heat a thin layer of oil in the pan and add the salmon fillets skin-side down. Weight them down gently with a plate, pressing the skin against the base of the pan. Cook for 1 minute, then remove the plate and cook for a further 2 minutes. Flip the fillets over and turn off the heat, allowing the fish to cook slowly for another 30seconds or so. Remove from the pan

Finish the risotto by stirring in the cream, plam sugar, salt and pepper to taste, and fried shallots.

Serve the cribs-skinned salmon fillets on top of the risotto and scatter with chives.

RECIPE OF THE WEEK: Chargrilled Squid

chargrilled squid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


This is one of the many barbecued dishes that are served by the sea at Jimbaran. In what
was formally a rustic coastal eating place dotted with simple grass huts, there are now
hundreds of bamboo tables and chairs perched on the sand, and tonnes of seafood being
served, from prawns to lobster and snapper to squid, for eager tourists. The secret at
Jimbaran is cooking the seafood over coconut husks for a delectable smokiness, and the
moist heat of the husks creates tender meat with glazed and burnished skin without
dryness. If you are flying into Denpasar at night, the smoke from the barbecues at
Jimbaran bay looks like an enormous bushfire.
This is a simple marinade and you can add any additional herbs. A bonus is that the
marinade can be prepared up to two weeks in advance and kept in the refrigerator.

MARINADE
100 ml vegetable or peanut oil
3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1–2 tablespoons kecap manis
2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
5 kaffir lime leaves, rolled into a bundle and finely shredded
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1 kg squid, cleaned
Tomato Sambal (page 000) to serve
lime wedges to serve
Combine the marinade ingredients in a large bowl and mix well.
Cut the squid into 10 cm tubes and quarter the tentacles lengthwise. Add to the
marinade, coating well, and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.
Heat a barbecue grill. Lift the squid out of the marinade and place on the grill. Cook,
turning occasionally and basting with the marinade, until golden brown and just cooked.
It should only take a few minutes.
Serve with tomato sambal and wedges of lime.

Serves 4

RECIPE OF THE WEEK | Chargrilled squid

This is one of the many barbecued dishes that are served by the sea at Jimbaran. In what was formally a rustic coastal eating place dotted with simple grass huts, there are now hundreds of bamboo tables and chairs perched on the sand, and tonnes of seafood being served, from prawns to lobster and snapper to squid, for eager tourists. The secret at Jimbaran is cooking the seafood over coconut husks for a delectable smokiness, and the moist heat of the husks creates tender meat with glazed and burnished skin without dryness. If you are flying into Denpasar at night, the smoke from the barbecues at Jimbaran bay looks like an enormous bushfire.

Chargrilled-squid_blog

This is a simple marinade and you can add any additional herbs. A bonus is that the marinade can be prepared up to two weeks in advance and kept in the refrigerator.

MARINADE

  • 100 ml vegetable or peanut oil
  • 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1–2 tablespoons kecap manis
  • 2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
  • 5 kaffir lime leaves, rolled into a bundle and finely shredded 1/2 teaspoon sea salt

1 kg squid, cleaned
Tomato Sambal (page 000) to serve lime wedges to serve

Combine the marinade ingredients in a large bowl and mix well.
Cut the squid into 10 cm tubes and quarter the tentacles lengthwise. Add to the marinade, coating well, and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.

Heat a barbecue grill. Lift the squid out of the marinade and place on the grill. Cook, turning occasionally and basting with the marinade, until golden brown and just cooked. It should only take a few minutes.

Serve with tomato sambal and wedges of lime.

Serves 4

Discover more recipes in my book Bali: Food of My Island Home